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Sanborn Maps North Carolina

Digital Sanborn Maps, 1867-1970, provides access to large-scale maps of North Carolina towns and cities.

For help resources visit: http://proquest.libguides.com/dsm/browse

Overview

Digital Sanborn® Maps delivers detailed property and land-use records that depict the grid of everyday life in more than 12,000 U.S. towns and cities across a century of change.

Sanborn® fire insurance maps are the most frequently consulted maps in libraries. Founded in 1867 by D. A. Sanborn, the Sanborn Map Company was the primary American publisher of fire insurance maps for nearly 100 years, repeatedly mapping towns and cities as they changed.

The maps provide a wealth of information, such as building outline, size and shape, windows and doors, street and sidewalk widths, boundaries, and property numbers. Plans often include details on construction materials and building use; and also depict pipelines, railroads, wells, water mains, dumps, and other features likely to affect the property's vulnerability to earthquake, fire, and flood.

Combined with other sources such as city directories, photographs, small-scale maps, census records, genealogies, and statistical data—the Sanborn Maps provide an unparalleled picture of life in American towns and cities.

Historic North Carolina Digital Newspaper Collection

Newspapers.com North Carolina Collection. 3.5 million pages of digitized content from over 1,000 NC county newspapers.

For search tips and help resources visit: https://proquest.libguides.com/newspapersdotcom/search

Overview

Includes:
  • The Franklin Press (1888–1906)
Some historic newspapers are digitized at the page-level, while others are digitized at the article level. The basic searching function is identical for both article-level and page-level. Every part of every page of ProQuest Historical Newspapers is full-text searchable, whether they are digitized at the article-level or page-level. If you search for a term such as the name “John Kennedy” and it appears in the text any place on a page, it will generate a hit for that page—whether it is in an article title, in an article, in an advertisement, etc.

The primary difference in searching article-level titles is in the Advanced Search: because they include article-level metadata, newspapers digitized at the article-level provide users with the ability to restrict search results to different portions of the newspaper (articles, advertisements, cartoons, etc.).

HeritageQuest Popular

Treasury of American genealogical sources: unique primary sources, local and family histories, and finding aids. Includes historical census, PERSI, Revolutionary War records, and more.

For search tips and help resources visit: https://proquest.libguides.com/hqo/searchtips

Overview

HeritageQuest® Online is a comprehensive treasury of American genealogical sources—rich in unique primary sources, local and family histories, and finding aids. 18th Century or 20th Century. European or Native American. Farm or Factory. East Coast or West Coast. Where does your American past begin?

Discover the amazing history of you with HeritageQuest Online. It delivers an essential collection of genealogical and historical sources—with coverage dating back to the 1700s—that can help people find their ancestors and discover a place’s past.

The collection consists of five core data sets:
  • Census collection contains over 700 million records from the U.S. Federal Census 1790-1940, and national censuses including Argentina, Netherlands, Czech Republic and several other countries.
  • Books collection contains over 22,000 family and local histories, compiled genealogies, documentary collections, church records, military records, vital records, city and county histories, and more.
  • City Directories with over 1.5 million records from various US city and county directories during 1821-1989.

DigitalNC

Explore the history and culture of North Carolina through original materials from cultural heritage repositories across the state.

The North Carolina Digital Heritage Center is a statewide digitization and digital publishing program housed in the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Digital Heritage Center works with cultural heritage institutions across North Carolina to digitize and publish historic materials online. Collections include:

Digital Public Library of America

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) provides access to millions of photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Find primary sources to use in school projects, academic research, family history research, and more.

Fore help resources visit: https://dp.la/guides

DPLA connects people to the riches held within America’s libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions. All of the materials found through DPLA—photographs, books, maps, news footage, oral histories, personal letters, museum objects, artwork, government documents, and so much more—are free and immediately available in digital format. The cultural institutions participating in DPLA represent the richness and diversity of America itself, from the smallest local history museum to our nation’s largest cultural institutions.

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